Sunday, June 18, 2017

Links & Reviews

- Rebecca Fishbein offers "A Brief History of the Strand," founded ninety years ago this year.

- David Laskin writes for the NYTimes Travel section on "The Hidden Treasures in Italian Libraries."

- A nicely illustrated 1819 ship's log sold at Swann last week for $20,800.

- Keith Houston highlights a new punctuation mark ("a Dutch interrobang") and interviews the typographer behind it.

- Tawrin Baker writes for the Huntington's blog on "Visualizing the Anatomy of the Eye."

- Maggs Bros. new shop gets the Architectural Digest treatment.

- Over at Past is Present, an interview with Chris Phillips about his research at AAS.

- Edward Whitley asks "Where did Leaves of Grass come from?"

- On 15 July, the Massachusetts Historical Society will host a "Transcribe-a-thon" to mark John Quincy Adams' 250th birthday.

- The Chicago Tribune reports on the upcoming $11 million renovation at the Newberry Library.

- Ellen G.K. Rubin's collection of movable books is featured in Atlas Obscura.

- Ian Ehling has been appointed Director of Fine Books & Manuscripts at Bonhams New York.

- Bookseller Garrett Scott offers up a really fascinating probate inventory featuring a detailed library list.

- In the TLS, Stuart Kelly on "Writing beyond the grave."

- If you have bought from or sold to ebay user davius-9srhw8rb, please contact the ABAA.

Reviews

- Yael Rice reviews the Sackler Gallery's recent exhibition "The Art of the Qu'ran" in the LARB.

- Erica Benner's Be Like the Fox; review by Edmund Fawcett in the NYTimes.

- Rüdiger Safranski's Goethe: Life as a Work of Art; review by Michael Hofmann in the NYTimes.

- Joe Berkowitz's Away with Words; review by Allan Fallow in the WaPo.

- The British Museum's exhibition and catalog on Hokusai; review by Peter Maber in the TLS.

Upcoming Auctions

- Books, Autographs and Works at Paper at Bloomsbury on 22 June.

- Fine Judaica at Kestenbaum and Company on 22 June.

- Books and Ephemera at National Book Auctions on 24 June.

Sunday, June 11, 2017

Links & Reviews

- Two notices from the ABAA about missing/stolen books: a copy of the first English edition of Melville's The Confidence Man, and an original photo album of the construction of the Madeira-Mamore Railroad.

- Rebecca Rego Barry highlights some key lots from the 15 June Christie's sale of the ornithological library of Dr. Gerald Dorros.

- NPR ran a story this week about Lovecraft-inspired board games.

- From Heather Wolfe at The Collation, "Imagining a lost set of common-place books."

- At Libraria, a report about recent research which has revealed forty sealskin binding over-covers on manuscripts from the library of Clairvaux Abbey, with indications that the practice may have been even more widespread in the collection.

- Over at the Princeton Graphic Arts Collection blog, "The Shakespeare that almost didn't happen."

- Rare Books Digest takes a look at the Vinegar Bible.

- Emily Midorikawa and Emma Claire Sweeney write for the TLS about the long-distance friendship between Harriet Beecher Stowe and George Eliot.

Book Reviews

- Sarah Perry's The Essex Serpent; review by Ron Charles in the WaPo.

- Mike Rapport's The Unruly City; review by Russell Shorto in the NYTimes.

Upcoming Auctions

- Art, Press & Illustrated Books at Swann Galleries on 13 June.

- Fine Books & Manuscripts, Including Americana at Sotheby's New York on 13 June.

- Fine Books, Atlases, Manuscripts and Photographs at Bonhams London on 14 June.

- Printed Books, Maps & Documents at Dominic Winter Auctioneers on 14 June.

- The Metropolitan Opera Guild Collection at Christie's New York on 15 June.

- The Ornithological Library of Gerald Dorros, MD at Christie's New York on 15 June.

- Fine Printed Books & Manuscripts Including Americana and the Eric C. Caren Collection at Christie's New York on 15 June.

- Rare Books & Manuscripts at PBA Galleries on 15 June.

- Books & Manuscripts at Freeman's on 16 June.

Sunday, June 04, 2017

Links & Reviews

- Registration is now open for a very interesting-looking conference this September, "BH and DH: Book History and Digital Humanities."

- Over at Past is Present, a new list of recent articles and books published by members of the AAS community.

- The National Library of Norway is planning to digitize works from the collections of Nigeria's National Library published in the Hausa, Igbo, and Yoruba languages.

- At recto | verso, a look at American documentary photography around the turn of the twentieth century.

- A report in the Telegraph suggests that Italian authorities have recently unraveled an art and book theft ring in the Turin area; one manuscript was found to have been stolen from the Royal Library of Turin in 2012. If anybody has more information about this story, I'd love to see it.

- Melbourne Rare Book Week begins on 30 June this year.

- Mary McClure posts at Echoes from the Vault about a lovely Book of Hours from the St Andrews collections.

- June's Rare Book Monthly articles include an update on the California law about the sale of autographed materials, and a report from Michael Stillman on the theft of an RAF logbook.

- Boston 1775 explores Isaiah Thomas' involvement with an American edition of Fanny Hill.

- Natasha Pizzey writes for the BBC about the Luis de Carvajal manuscript recently returned to Mexico.

- Danuta Kean reports for the Guardian about the sale of the library of William O'Brien, coming up this week at Sotheby's.

Book Reviews

- Anthony Horowitz's Magpie Murders; review by Charles Finch in the WaPo.

- Max Décharné's Vulgar Tongues; review by Allan Fallow in the WaPo.

Upcoming Auctions

- Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Color Plate Books at Swann Galleries on 7 June.

- The Library of William O'Brien: Property of the Milltown Park Charitable Trust at Sotheby's London on 7 June.

- Fine Books and Manuscripts, including Illustration Art at Bonhams New York on 7 June.


Sunday, May 28, 2017

Links & Reviews

- Two theft notices from the ABAA: a Thomas Jefferson autograph note and a 1610 folio volume, A Display of Heraldry.

- NEH Chairman William Adams resigned from his post last week. The agency is targeted for elimination under the president's FY18 budget (call your representatives). See their FAQ on where things go from here.

- On the proposed budget cuts (which reach far beyond NEH), see Bethany Nowviskie's post to a Digital Library Federation list.

- Alcoholics Anonymous has filed suit for the return of the printers' copy of the organization's "Big Book," scheduled to be sold at auction on 8 June by Profiles in History. The annotated typescript was previously sold at auction in 2004 and 2007.

- Honey & Wax Booksellers have announced a new book-collecting prize open to women book collectors in the U.S. under 30 years old.

- Aaron Pratt has been appointed the new Carl and Lily Pforzheimer Curator of Early Books and Manuscripts at the Harry Ransom Center.

- Carla Giaimo writes for Atlas Obscura on "The Lost Typefaces of W.A. Dwiggins."

- Rob Rulon-Miller provides an overview of this summer's Colorado Antiquarian Book Seminar.

- Elizabeth Savage posted a new update to her census of early modern frisket sheets (project homepage) and has a post at The Conveyor about a recent related find.

- Rare Book School's summer lecture schedule is out.

-Book curses on the BL's medieval manuscripts blog.

- Kate Mitas has begun a series on archival cataloging for booksellers.

- A new exhibition at the National Library of New Zealand, He Tohu, highlights three important founding documents in the country's history.

- From James Ascher on the UVA Scholars' Lab blog, "Visualizing Paper Evidence Using Digital Reproductions."

- At Echoes from the Vault, a look at some interesting finds from the St Andrews Burgh records.

- Mary Bendel-Simso talked to The Academic Minute about her work using digital newspaper archives to find early American detective fiction.

- At Notes from Under Grounds, Nora Benedict Frye posts about her current UVA Special Collections exhibition on Borges and bibliography.

- Rebecca Mead reports on the recent identification of a "lost" Edith Wharton play.

- Will Gore writes for the Spectator on "Why rare books are thriving in the digital age."

- Danuta Kean reports for the Guardian about Peter Steinberg and Gail Crowther's recent identification of unpublished Sylvia Plath poems found by examining a sheet of carbon paper in Plath's papers at the Lilly Library.

- Miranda Cooper writes for Tablet Magazine about "500 Years of Treasures from Oxford," an exhibition now on display at the Center for Jewish History.

- Tom Hyry highlights the current Houghton Library exhibition, "Open House 75: Houghton Staff Select."

- A few early bookplates from Princeton's collections are featured on the Graphic Arts blog.

- At Medieval Manuscripts Provenance, notes on an NYPL breviary fragment.

- Abbie Weinberg marked the 400th birthday of Elias Ashmole with a Collation post.

- Thirty-three books stolen from Jewish communities were donated to the Foundation for the Preservation of Jewish Heritage in Warsaw last week.

Book Reviews

- Charlie English's The Book Smugglers of Timbuktu; review by Justin Marozzi in the Spectator.

- Holger Hoock's Scars of Independence; review by Jane Kamensky in the NYTimes.

- James Barron's The One-Cent Magenta; review by Rebecca Rego Barry at the Fine Books Blog.

- John Grisham's Camino Island; review by Jocelyn McClurg in USA Today (apparently it's about rare book and manuscript collecting ... )

- Beth Underdown's The Witchfinder's Sister; review by Helen Castor in the NYTimes.

- Rüdiger Safranski's Goethe: Life as a Work of Art; review by Michael Dirda in the WaPo.

- Stephen Fry's new audiobook edition of the Sherlock Holmes stories; review by Simon Callow in the NYTimes.

Upcoming Auctions

The Richard Beagle Collection of Angling and Sporting Books, Part I on 1 June at PBA Galleries.

Arader Galleries Summer 2017 Sale on 3 June.

Books and Ephemera at National Book Auctions on 3 June.

Sunday, May 14, 2017

Links & Reviews

- From the Globe and Mail, a profile of Alberto Manguel in his new role as director of Argentina's national library.

- An 800-word Harry Potter prequel written by J. K. Rowling and sold for charity in 2008 was stolen from Birmingham last month.

- The BBC reported this week on the identification of an early Caxton leaf at the University of Reading.

- Rebeccca Rego Barry writes for the Fine Books Blog about Maggs Bros. new headquarters, which will open on 24 May.

- Ruth Guilding has a "First Person" profile of T. J. Cobden-Sanderson for the TLS.

- Alex Preston writes for the Observer on "How real books have trumped ebooks," drawing on several recent studies showing a recent increase in print book sales.

- Another security alert from the ABAA, for a copy of Steele's Essay upon Gardening (1793) believed stolen from the New York Book Fair.

- Lloyd Cotsen, known for his collection of children's books which now form the Cotsen Children's Library at Princeton, died this week at age 88. See the LATimes obituary.

- A new digital archive, Early American Serialized Novels, is now available.

- Christopher Lancette writes for the Fine Books Blog about his visit to the Washington Antiquarian Book Fair, and about rediscovering a love for his own library.

- Dalya Alberge writes for the Guardian about the forged Dylan artwork mentioned here last month.

- Elizabeth Yale's piece in the Atlantic on the new film "The Circle" asks "how can the past be used to reimagine women’s technological agency?"

Reviews

- John Boles' Jefferson: Architect of American Liberty; review by Jonathan Yardley in the WaPo.

- Matthew Rubery's The Untold Story of the Talking Book; review by Matthew P. Brown for Public Books.

Upcoming Auctions

- 19th & 20th Century Literature at Swann Galleries on 16 May.

- Rare Books, Manuscripts, Maps & Photographs at Lyon & Turnbull on 17 May.

- Fine Literature & Fine Books at PBA Galleries on 18 May.

- Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts and Continental and Russian Books and Musical Manuscripts at Sotheby's London on 23 May.

Sunday, May 07, 2017

Links & Reviews

Apologies for the radio silence; it's been a busy month. As I mentioned previously, I traveled to the Florida Antiquarian Book Fair two weekends ago and to the Washington Antiquarian Book Fair last weekend; both were excellent events with good, vibrant crowds.

- Garrett Scott has a really touching "In Memoriam" post on the ABAA blog about Robert Fraker of Savoy Books, who died this week after a battle with cancer. I remember well Robert's wonderful talk at the 2012 AAS event Garrett mentions. About ten years ago at the Boston Book Fair, Robert sold me one of the items I'm most pleased to have in my own collection, and consistently since then he's had something to show me at the fair that he knew would make my mouth water and/or that I would want to help find a home for. Visiting him and his wife Lillian at their booth has long been a highlight of the fair for me. My deep, deep condolences to Lillian, his family, and his colleagues, and thanks to Garrett for his lovely post.

- Entries for this year's National Collegiate Book Collecting Contest are now being accepted; they are due by 31 May.

- May's Rare Book Monthly articles include Michael Stillman on a stolen library book returning to the shelves and a report on the BPL's rare books inventory.

- Serial book thief Laéssio Rodrigues de Oliveira and an accomplice, Valnique Bueno, are suspected in the theft of more than four hundred rare books from the Rio de Janeiro Federal University in Brazil during a construction project. Via Mitch Fraas, a longer article about the thefts, in Portuguese, includes a list of the stolen titles.

- A list of stolen maps and engravings has been posted over on the ABAA blog, as has the description of a copy of Paine's Common Sense stolen by fraud to someone in Los Angeles and two more books stolen in the New England area in mid-April.

- Princeton has acquired a vellum fragment of a Gutenberg Bible preserved as a binding. Eric White has an excellent writeup.

- Lisa Fagin Davis has a thorough post on the manuscript recently returned by the Boston Public Library to the Italian government. More via the Fine Books Blog and the Boston Globe.

- The Harry Ransom Center has acquired the archive of Peter O'Toole for $400,000.

- The earliest known draft of a portion of the King James Bible, identified at Cambridge in 2015, has now been digitized and published in the Cambridge Digital Library.

- Joe Felcone talked to Wendi Maloney for an LC blog post about his work with 19th-century copyright records.

- A 13th-century manuscript stolen from a Turkish library was identified in a Sotheby's auction catalog withdrawn from sale, according to Turkish media reports.

- Fascinating post by conservator Kristi Westberg for the Huntington blog about "Preserving the Signs of Censorship."

- Adam Reinherz goes inside the Caliban Books warehouse for the Jewish Chronicle.

- The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation has acquired an important collection of early Virginia maps.

- In the New Yorker, "How to Decode an Ancient Roman's Handwriting."

- Two new digital collections from the Library of Congress are now available: Manuscripts from St. Catherine's Monastery and the Margaret Bayard Smith papers.

- A manuscript copy on parchment of the Declaration of Independence in the West Sussex Record Office, while long cataloged, is being studied closely for the first time by researchers for the Declaration Resources Project; they have concluded it probably dates to the 1780s. Coverage in the NYTimes and Phys.org.

- Rebecca Romney looks at thirty years of cover designs for The Handmaid's Tale.

- Nicholas Pickwoad's obituary of Christopher Clarkson appeared in the Guardian.

- Lauren Hewes has posted a second installment of photographs showing printers at work, from the AAS collections.

- Cambridge (MA) bookseller and bookbinder Robert Marshall died on 9 April; an obituary appeared in the Boston Globe.

- From Mike Furlough, "What Libraries Did With Google Books," based in part on James Somers' Atlantic piece "Torching the Modern-Day Library of Alexandria."

- Over at Manuscript Road Trip, a stop in New Bedford to look at an important and understudied Book of Hours in the New Bedford Public Library.

- More Shakespeare's World finds for the OED.

- Among the scholarships available for this year's CABS is the new Belle da Costa Greene Scholarship for a bookseller or librarian from an underrepresented community.

- A new book has been published to mark the Houghton Library's 75th birthday. Looks like a good one! More on the anniversary celebrations here.

- Swann sold a complete copy of The Cherokee Messenger on 27 April; it fetched $4,500.

- New: a University of Surrey project, Women's Literary Culture before the Conquest.

- The UVA Law Library has received a grant to digitize copies of the books Jefferson included in his original selection of law texts for the university.

- Robert Oldham writes for the APHA blog about Adam Ramage's one-pull common press.

- The State Library of Massachusetts blog has a post on the history and travels of the manuscript of William Bradford's Of Plimoth Plantation.

Reviews

- John Julius Norwich's Four Princes; review by Alan Mikhail in the NYTimes.

- Peter Brooks' Flaubert in the Ruins of Paris; review by Sunil Iyengar in the WaPo.

- Beth Underdown's The Witchfinder's Sister; review by Carrie Dunsmore in the WaPo.

- Helena Kelly's Jane Austen, the Secret Radical; review by Ruth Franklin in the WaPo.

- Jeff Vandermeer's Borne; review by Elizabeth Hand in the LATimes.

- Charlie English's The Book Smugglers of Timbuktu; review by Peter Thoneman in the TLS.

Upcoming Auctions

- Travels, Atlases, Maps & Natural History at Sotheby's London on 9 May.

- Printed Books, Maps & Documents at Dominic Winters Auctioneers on 10 May.

- Manuscripts at Heritage Auctions on 11 May.

Sunday, April 16, 2017

Links & Reviews

- Christela Guerra reports for the Boston Globe about current effort at the BPL to get a full inventory of the rare books and manuscripts in their collections.

- From John Garcia at JHIBlog, "The Other Samuel Johnson: African-American Labor in the Vicinity of the Early U.S. Book Trade."

- Over at The Pressbengel Project, making parchment out of salmon skin.

- Humanities magazine has an interview with library historian Wayne Wiegand.

- Maria Sibylla Merian is the featured subject at Echoes from the Vault.

- The NEH Impact Index is well worth spending some time with.

- Lisa Fagin Davis posts at Manuscript Road Trip about Otto Ege and the Lima (OH) Public Library.

- Jennifer Schuessler reports for the NYTimes on the James Baldwin archive, newly purchased by the Schomburg Center but some of which will remain closed to researchers for twenty more years.

- Scott Rosenberg writes for Backchannel on "How Google Book Search Got Lost."

- AAS has a podcast interview with Ezra Greenspan about his work on Frederick Douglass, editing Book History, and more.

- More on that archive of Sylvia Plath letters mentioned last month from Sylvia Plath Info and the Guardian.

- In the Irish Times, a story about a library theft that has inspired a new children's book.

- The British Library has announced a major expansion plan.

Reviews

- The Card Catalog, a new Library of Congress publication; review by Rebecca Rego Barry for the Fine Books Blog.

- Lyndal Roper's Martin Luther; review by Andrew Pettegree in the NYTimes.

- Brian Doyle's The Adventures of John Carson in Several Quarters of the World; review by Jenny Davidson in the NYTimes.

- Shelley DeWees' Not Just Jane; review by Caroline Franklin in the TLS.

Upcoming Auctions

- Images & Objects: Photographs & Photobooks at Swann on 20 April.

- Americana - Travel & Exploration - World History - Directories - Cartography at PBA Galleries on 20 April.

- The Maurice Neville Collection of Modern Literature (Part III) at Sotheby's New York on 24 April.

- Rare Books, Autographs & Maps at Doyle on 26 April [includes books deaccessioned from the College of New Rochelle].

- The Giancarlo Beltrame Library of Scientific Books (Part III) at Christie's London on 26 April.

- Printed & Manuscript Americana at Swann on 27 April.

- The Library of the Late Hubert Dingwall at Bloomsbury on 27 April.

Sunday, April 09, 2017

Links & Reviews

A very nice Virginia Antiquarian Book Fair is in the books; if you missed it this year, make sure you get it on your calendar for next spring. Well worth a visit.

- Philip Durkin writes for the Shakespeare's World blog about a new use of "white lie" discovered by a transcriber, antedating the previous OED citation by nearly two centuries!

- Now on display at UVA's Special Collections library, a new exhibition on Borges and his publication history, curated by Nora Benedict.

- What looks a very interesting new concept from the American Philosophical Society: a circulation-driven recommendation tool for archival and manuscript repositories. It'll be very interesting to see this in action.

- Rachel Chanter writes for the Peter Harrington blog about a Bob Dylan artwork forgery: a cautionary tale indeed.

- JHIBlog is hosting a "book forum" on Jeffrey Andrew Barash's Collective Memory and the Historical Past. Michael Meng has the first post.

- Hugh Gilmore has the first in a series about a recent house-call to look at a professor's book collection.

- Always look through the box of random books.

- Over at Modern IP History, Zvi Rosen writes on his efforts to find and make available more than 2,000 pages of pre-1870 American copyright records that had been presumed lost.

- The Kickstarter campaign for Bruce Kennett's biography of W. A. Dwiggins remains open; though the project was fully funded, you can still sign up for various rewards, &c.

- The Watkinson Library (Trinity College) has received a nearly-complete set of the Modern Library's first series (some 600 volumes).

- The Daily Beast has a report on the January theft of rare books from a London warehouse.

- Videos of the 2017 Sandars Lectures by Toshiyuki Takamiya are now available.

- A complaints book of the Plantin Press journeymen for the period 1713–1769 is available online [via Aaron Pratt on Twitter].

- The Library of Congress and the National Museum of African American History and Culture have jointly acquired a photo album containing and early and previously unknown photograph of Harriet Tubman.

- Atlas Obscura has a piece on the work by researchers at the UCL Institute for Sustainable Heritage who are trying to "capture, analyze, and catalog historic and culturally important scents."

- Will Pooley's "Floundering" is a great read on the sometime drudgery of archival research.

- Acme Binding's Paul Parisi is the subject of a brief profile in the Boston Globe.

Reviews

- A. C. Grayling's The Age of Genius; review by Thomas Colville for Reviews in History.

- Yale's new edition of the Voynich Manuscript, edited by Raymond Clemens; review by Eamon Duffy in the NYRB.

- Paul Watson's Ice Ghosts; review by Ian McGuire in the NYTimes.

- Brian Doyle's The Adventures of John Carson in Several Quarters of the World; review by James McNamara in the WaPo.

- Michael Dirda highlights several recent books about books in the WaPo.

Upcoming Auction

- Rare Golf Books & Memorabilia at PBA Galleries on 13 April.

Sunday, April 02, 2017

Links & Reviews

Lots of book fairs coming up this month: I'll be at the Virginia Antiquarian Book Fair in Richmond next weekend, then the Florida Antiquarian Book Fair (21–32 April) and the Washington Antiquarian Book Fair (28–29 April) - if you're there too, please do come by the Rare Book School table! (Speaking of which, there are still open seats in several RBS classes this summer in case you're thinking about applying).

- The ABAA blog reports a theft from Atlanta Vintage Books on 30 March. A list of the stolen items is included.

- A 17th-century notebook containing scholarly notes on Shakespeare's works showed up at the "Antiques Roadshow" stand at Caversham Park in Berkshire. The segment will air on tonight's episode of the show (in the UK). Grace Ioppolo notes on Twitter that other manuscripts quoting Shakespeare can be found in the Catalogue of English Literary Manuscripts (CELM).

- The University of Rochester has acquired an important collection of letters by Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and other suffragettes, as well as related printed material. The archive was collected by Isabella Beecher Hooker, and used as a kind of "circulating library," according to Jennifer Schuessler's report in the NYTimes. See also the University's press release.

- The NEH announced $21.7 million in grants for some 200 projects this week.

- The presidents of Independent Research Libraries Association (IRLA) libraries released a joint statement this week in support of the NEH, IMLS, and NHPRC.

- In the TLS, Dennis Duncan offers "Index, A celebration of the".

- Over at Medieval Manuscript Provenance, Peter Kidd profiles bibliophile Henry Huth.

- "Typographic Satire" from the Princeton Graphic Arts Collection blog.

- Rebecca Rego Barry writes for the Fine Books Blog on "HarperCollins at 200." The company's bicentennial website is very much worth a browse (disorienting effects aside).

- Submissions for the 17th ILAB Breslauer Prize are due by the end of April.

- Paul Moxon is compiling a list for the APHA website of printing history publications written or edited by APHA members, award laureates, lecturers, and fellows. Help him if you can.

- This week's Bonhams sale "The Contents of Glyn Cywarch" was a rare white-glove auction, in which every lot sold. I'll have more on this one in the next Fine Books & Collections.

- Richard Hell offers some "Confessions of a Book Collector" in the Village Voice.

- Allan Stypeck of Second Story Books is the subject of a WaPo profile by Neely Tucker.

- A collection of material related to Mata Hari sold at auction in the Netherlands this week for €45,000.

Reviews

- David Bellos' The Novel of the Century; reviews by Tobias Grey in the NYTimes and Michael Lindgren in the WaPo.

- Caroline Winterer's American Enlightenments; review by Tom Cutterham at Reviews in History.

Upcoming Auctions

- Printed Books, Maps & Atlases at Dominic Winter on 5–6 April.

- Fine Books with Science at Medicine at PBA Galleries on 6 April.

- Spring Magic Auction at Potter and Potter on 8 April.

Sunday, March 26, 2017

Links & Reviews

- A. S. G. Edwards reports for the TLS on this years Sandars Lectures, delivered by Toshiyuki Takamiya.

- JFK's diary covering the summer of 1945 will be sold at RR Auction on 26 April.

- New editor(s) are sought for Common-place.

- Sarah Hovde writes for The Collation on "The Guild of Women-Binders and the 'bindings of tomorrow.'"

- Edward Wong in the NYTimes: "Printing the Ancient Way Keeps Buddhist Texts Alive in Tibet."

- The British Library is digitizing its Anglo-Saxon manuscripts: 175 are available as of last week.

- Rudolf II's collection of some 750 watercolors of plants and animals will go on long-term loan to the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam.

- Author Charlie Lovett is profiled in the News & Record.

- James McBride of William Reese Co. gets the "Bright Young Booksellers" spotlight this week.

- Jennifer Schuessler has a great piece in the NYTimes, "A Journey Into the Merriam-Webster Word Factory."

- A seventeenth-century map found wadded up and stuffed into the chimney of an Aberdeenshire house has been conserved and is now on display at the National Library of Scotland.

- The Londonist goes "Inside London's Oldest Bookshop," Hatchard's.

- Kate Murphy writes for the NYTimes about love letters at auction.

Reviews

- James Barron's The One-Cent Magenta; review by Sarah Laskow in the NYTimes.

- Richard Holmes' This Long Pursuit; review by Michael Dirda in the WaPo.

Upcoming Auctions

- Two Great Scottish Collections: Property from the Forbeses of Pitsligo and the Marquesses of Lothian at Sotheby's London on 28 March.

- The Contents of Glyn Cywarch at Bonhams London on 29 March.

- Books and Works on Paper at Bloomsbury on 30 March.

- Printed & Manuscript African Americana at Swann Galleries on 30 March.

Sunday, March 19, 2017

Links & Reviews

Apologies for the delays in getting a post up: it hasn't been for lack of news, but simply because much travel over the last several weeks has kept me very busy. The SEA conference in Tulsa was an excellent one, and it was a delight to see so many friends both there and during the book fair festivities in New York last weekend.

- From the book fair: Scott Zieher for the Village Voice; Erin Schreiner for LitHub; Rebecca Rego Barry for Fine Books Blog.

- The president's budget plan calls for the elimination of the NEA, NEH, and IMLS, among many other effective, efficient, and worthy programs. While this is indeed only a proposal, it says much about the priorities of this administration, and if you value the good works supported by these and other programs targeted, I urge you to contact your representatives and tell them so. Some links on this front: Christopher Knight in the LATimes "The NEA works. Why does Trump want to cut it?"; Andrea Scott in the New Yorker; Amanda French's "A Visit to the Rayburn Building"; "Why We Need the NEA and the NEH" by Mellon Foundation executive vice president Marlët Westermann; a call from AHA to its membership urging them to contact Congress about the budget plan; Sophie Gilbert in the Atlantic on "The Real Cost of Trump's Abolishing the National Endowment for the Arts"; PEN America's excellent "What You Can Do" post; statement by the leadership of the Digital Library Federation;

- The March Rare Book Monthly articles include Michael Stillman's report on the brazen warehouse theft of rare books in late January, a piece by Forum Auctions' Rupert Powell on the state of the book auction world, and Eric Caren on several of his upcoming auctions.

- From Molly Hardy at Past is Present, "Running the Numbers on Early American Literature."

- The Newberry Library has acquired the Bexley Hall Rare Book Collection.

- Helen Hazen writes for the American Scholar about her job as librarian of a convent library in Peru and her efforts to catalog the rare materials in the collection.

- From Sarah Laskow for Atlas Obscura, "The Unsung Delight of a Well-Designed Endpaper."

- Vincent Noce has an update in The Art Newspaper about the Aristophil collection of rare books and manuscripts, auctions of which could begin at Drouot as early as September. The sales could be spread out over "at least six to ten years," according to the report.

- Jane Kamensky has won the New-York Historical Society's annual book prize for A Revolution in Color: The World of John Singleton Copley.

- Senators McCaskill and Carper have written to AOTUS David Ferriero expressing concern about the Trump Administration's compliance with the Presidential Records Act and the Federal Records Act.

- Jay Moschella has an update on the BPL's project of digitizing their earliest printed books.

- Ebook sales in the UK fell in 2016, for the second year in a row, as print sales increased.

- New blog of interest: Caribbean Histories.

- The family of Antonin Scalia will donate the justice's papers to the Harvard Law School Library.

- I've neglected to link to a recent volume of the Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society which will be of interest to many readers; the papers are drawn from the APS symposium "Fabrication, Verification, Authentication," and include Nick Wilding's essay "Forging the Moon," on the Galileo forgeries.

- Owen Williams and Rachel Dankert post for The Collation about "The Folger as a Collection of Collections."

- Registration is open for this year's Texas A&M Book History Workshop.

- From Tess Goodman at Inciting Sparks, "Reading As If To Live."

- Jackie Penny posts at Past is Present about the upcoming construction project at AAS.

- Daniel Dreisbach has a post for SHEAR adapted from his new book Reading the Bible with the Founding Fathers.

- The Maine State Library and Archives have jointly launched the Digital Maine Transcription Project.

- Rebecca Romney gets the "Bright Young Booksellers" spotlight.

- The Liesborn Gospels will return to Germany after a $3 million deal.

- Noah Sheola posts for the Houghton Library Blog about recataloging several undated seventeenth- and eighteenth-century quartos of Julius Caesar from the Houghton collections.

- Over at The Junto, a Q&A with Patrick Spero and Michael Zuckerman, editors of The American Revolution Reborn.

- The Book Collector has launched a contest to design the "27th letter."

- There's an excellent cataloging/provenance mystery post over on the Perne & Ward Libraries blog.

- Publisher George Braziller died this week at the age of 101. See the NYTimes obituary.

- Peter Steinberg has a post at Sylvia Plath Info about an important Plath archive currently offered for sale by bookseller Ken Lopez.

- At Verso, the Huntington Library's blog, Andrew Walkling posts about the printing process(es) used for a 1685 songbook.

- Scholar-librarian Michael Turner also died this week: Ian Gadd has a post on SHARP-L about Turner's long and productive career.

- Oxford professor Adam Smyth talks to cataloger Lucy Kelsall and conservator Nikki Tomkins about the library of Nicholas Crouch, now at Balliol College.

Reviews

- Charlie Lovett's The Lost Book of the Grail; review by Rebecca Rego Barry at the Fine Books Blog.

- The American Revolution Reborn, edited by Patrick Spero and Michael Zuckerman; review by Christopher Minty at The Junto.

- James Barron's The One-Cent Magenta; review by Timothy R. Smith in the WaPo.

- Spencer McBridge's Pulpit & Nation; review by Jonathan Wilson at The Junto.

- Laurel Thatcher Ulrich's A House Full of Females; review by Louisa Thomas in the WaPo.

- Eugene Hammond's Jonathan Swift and John Stubbs' Jonathan Swift; review by Claude Rawson in the TLS.

- Sidney Berger's The Dictionary of the Book; review by Dennis Duncan in the TLS [paywalled].

Upcoming Auctions

- Fine Literature with Lawrence Ferlinghetti and the Beats at PBA Galleries on 23 March.

- Texana and Western Americana at Heritage Auctions on 24 March.

- Spring 2017 auction at Arader Galleries on 25 March.

Saturday, February 25, 2017

Links & Reviews

- The 10th biennial conference of the Society of Early Americanists is coming up this week in Tulsa. I've organized a panel there on the future of American library history, where I hope to prompt a good conversation about current tools for working with historical library records and what tools we need in order to make even better use of these.

- After that, it's off to New York for Rare Book Week: three book fairs and lots of other goings-on.

- Harvard Magazine features a highlight article in celebration of Houghton Library's 75th anniversary.

- Coming soon, the Stationers' Register Online.

- Dawn Albinger of Archives Fine Books in Australia has a post up on the ILAB site about her work recently to restore a stolen book to its rightful home.

- A serialized Walt Whitman novel from 1852 has been identified and published. More coverage on NPR.

- From Erin Blake at The Collation, "Manuscripts in libraries: catalog versus finding aid."

- In the "Bright Young Booksellers" series, Nate Pedersen talks to Derek and Anna Walker of Edinburgh's McNaughtan's Bookshop.

Reviews

- John Stubbs' Jonathan Swift: The Reluctant Rebel; reviews by James McNamara in the NYTimes and Jeffrey Meyers in the LATimes.

- Anders Rydell's The Book Thieves; review by Michael S. Roth in the WaPo.

- Sean Wilentz's The Politicians & the Egalitarian; review by Christopher Childers at Reviews in History.

Upcoming Auctions

- Fine Books and Manuscripts at Bonhams London, 1 March.

- Rare Books at Heritage New York, 8 March.

- Fine Books and Manuscripts at Bonhams New York, 9 March.

- Early Printed, Medical, Scientific & Travel Books at Swann Galleries, 9 March.

Sunday, February 19, 2017

Links & Reviews

- The California book fair(s) are behind us and here comes New York. Recaps from Oakland from Tavistock Books, Oak Knoll Books, and Lux Mentis. It was my first visit to the CA Antiquarian Book Fair in Oakland; the Rare Book School table stayed busy for much of the fair and it was a treat to see so many friends and meet lots of new folks. Found a few good books, too!

- More on that theft of a shipment of rare books from a warehouse in London: see the stolen-book.org page for a PDF list of the titles. The ABA posted a statement about the thefts, the Guardian covered the story, and the Daily Mail ran a report (which the ABA secretary described as "more than a little sensationalist" - take it with a grain of salt).

- Brenda Cronin profiles Glenn Horowitz for the WSJ.

- Robert Darnton offers "The True History of Fake News" in the NYRB.

- Mark Samuels Lasner has donated his collection of British literature and art to the University of Delaware.

- Ella Morton writes for Atlas Obscura about "library hand," the penmanship technique once common on library catalog cards.

- Audio of selected presentations from RBMS 2016 is now available.

- The Harry Ransom Center has posted video of Eric White's recent talk there about the HRC copy of the Gutenberg Bible.

- Don't miss Matt Kirschenbaum's "Books.Files" in the new Archive Journal.

- Sarah Werner asks "what do digitized first folios do for us?"

- The Newberry Library has received a Mellon Foundation grant to create a website for training in Italian Renaissance paleography.

- At their annual meeting during Bibliography Week, APHA presented awards to Lisa Unger Baskin and to the U.S. Government Printing Office, and a Mark Samuels Lasner Fellowship to Amanda Stuckey.

- From Sarah Larson for the New Yorker: "The Librarian of Congress and the Greatness of Humility."

- The Internet Archive has reached the semifinalist stage in the competition for a $100 million grant from the MacArthur Foundation.

- APHA also offered a sneak peak into the forthcoming Printing History 21.

- Maddy Smith writes for the BL's Untold Lives blog about their recent acquisition of the only known copy of a 1650 schoolbook, The Grounds of Learning.

- Over at The Collation, an 1838 promptbook covered in coarse cloth.

- On the OUP Blog, Vincent Carretta asks if Phillis Wheatley's husband was a "crook or a dreamer"?

- New from the Bodleian: The William Henry Fox Talbot Catalogue Raisonné. See their press release for more.

- LitHub has launched a new series on librarians in the 21st century.

- Nick Holdstock writes for the Guardian about cataloging Doris Lessing's library.

- Daniel Pollack-Pelzner explores "The Radical Argument of the New Oxford Shakespeare" for the New Yorker's Page-Turner blog.

- Behind a paywall, alas, but Haaretz has a report on the Kafka manuscripts by Hilo Glazer.

Reviews

- Karen Baston's Charles Areskine's Library; review by Alexander Murdoch at Reviews in History.

- Anders Rydell's The Book Thieves; review by David Holahan in the CSM.

- Randall Fuller's The Book That Changed America; review by Jerry A. Coyne in the WaPo.

- "The Art of the Qur'an" at the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery; review by Robert F. Worth in the NYRB.

- A November 2016 symposium on women's book history at Texas A&M; review by Kate Ozment at Early Modern Online Bibliography.

Upcoming Auctions

- Americana - Travel & Exploration - World History - Photographs - Cartography at PBA Galleries, 23 February.

- Books and Works on Paper at Bloomsbury, 23 February.

Sunday, February 05, 2017

Links & Reviews

- The ABAA put out a security alert this week about the theft of a shipment of rare books from a West London warehouse.

- Mike Cummings has a piece in YaleNews, "Authenticating the Oldest Book in the Americas," about the recent scholarly work on dating the Grolier Codex.

- Two notebooks from the collections of Philadelphia's Girard College were recently returned; they went missing from Girard sometime between 1964 (when they were microfilmed) and the early 2000s, when their absence was noted.

- The February Rare Book Monthly features Michael Stillman's analysis of 2016 book auction prices, Bruce McKinney writing about a new book on the Eberstadt firm, and more.

- The AAS has acquired a collection of more than fifty manuscript sermons by Massachusetts minister Joseph Avery.

- David Sellers guest-posts on the Oak Knoll blog about printing, design, and bookselling in Havana, with some pictures from his recent trip there.

- Barbara Bair posts for the LC blog about the recently-digitized Whitman papers from the Charles E. Feinberg Collection.

- Peter Dobrin provides an update on the Sendak library matter.

- Provenance images from the collections at Bryn Mawr can now be found in the Provenance Online Project.

- The Concord Free Public Library has acquired a collection of Louisa May Alcott manuscripts.

- Over at Echoes From the Vault, the first post in a series on "book use and marginal contentions" in 18th-century books from the St. Andrews collections.

- Amy McDonald writes for the Devil's Tale blog about the Aldine Press Metadata Project.

- The ABAA has published an "In Memoriam" post for Bernard Rosenthal, with some wonderful stories from his colleagues.

- New: the Needham Calculator, useful for determining the category and size of 15th-century paper.

- Lorraine Berry writes for the Guardian on bibliomania.

- Lisa Fagin Davis has launched an Ege Field Guide, for identifying Otto Ege manuscript leaves "in the wild."

- Derek O'Leary posts on the JHI Blog about "Jared Sparks' American Archives."

- Over on the Course of Human Events blog, a look at the custodians of the engrossed parchment copy of the Declaration of Independence over the years.

Reviews

- Michael Sims' Arthur and Sherlock; reviews by Graham Moore in the NYTimes and Amy Henderson in the WaPo.

- Laurel Thacher Ulrich's A House Full of Females; review by Beverly Gage in the NYTimes.

- Robert McCracken Peck's The Natural History of Edward Lear; review by Adam Kendon in the TLS.

- Raymond Clemens' new edition of the Voynich Manuscript; review by Dustin Illingworth in the LARB.

- Matthew Mason's Apostle of Union; review by Daniel Crofts for Reviews in History.

- The Royal College of Physicians' exhibit on Sir Thomas Browne, "A Cabinet of Rarities;" review by Ruth Scurr in the TLS.

Upcoming Auctions

- Livres et Manuscrits at Sotheby's Paris, 8 February.

- Rare Books & Manuscripts at PBA Galleries (in Oakland), 12 February.

- Icons & Images: Photographs & Photobooks at Swann, 14 February.

- Remaining Books from the Library of Franklin Brooke-Hitching at Forum Auctions (online sale), 15 February.

- Books, Maps & Manuscripts at Freeman's, 17 February.

Sunday, January 22, 2017

Links & Reviews

- Penn has acquired the only known copy of "Elegy on the Death of Aquila Rose," printed by Benjamin Franklin shortly after his arrival in Philadelphia in 1723. See coverage in Philly.com, the WaPo, and the Philadelphia Inquirer. The broadside was included in a scrapbook of material collected by Samuel Hazard in the 19th century and later purchased by manuscripts dealer Carmen Valentino. Both the broadside and the scrapbook are currently on display at Penn's Van Pelt-Dietrich Library Center.

- The strong showing for Hamilton manuscripts at Sotheby's this week made the NYTimes, Bloomberg, and even SNL's "Weekend Update."

- The EMMO beta site is now live. See the Collation post for more info.

- Roberta Kwok writes about the Folger's Shakespeare's World crowdsourced transcription project for the New Yorker.

- Rare Book Week West 2017 is coming up soon!

- Heather Wolfe and Michael Witmore have a joint Collation post, "William Shakespeare, Scholar and Gentleman."

- The Jay I. Kislak Foundation has made a major gift of some 2,300 rare books and manuscripts to the University of Miami and Miami Dade College.

- Kathleen Lynch takes a deep dive into Folger First Folio number 54.

- Ana Marie Cox interviewed Carla Hayden for the NYTimes.

- Leo Cadogan is profiled in the "Bright Young Booksellers" series.

- The National Library of Israel has acquired the remainder of the Valmadonna Trust Library.

- Bookseller Ed Smith interviewed Kurt Brokaw about selling books on the sidewalks of New York.

- Michael J. Barsanti has been named director of the Library Company of Philadelphia.

- Nate D. Sanders Auctions will sell a copy of the 1494 Basel edition of the Columbus letter on 30 January.

- Several photographs from the 1911 Scott expedition will be sold at Bonhams next month.

Reviews

- Randall Fuller's The Book That Changed America; review by Eric Foner in the NYTimes.

- Robert Gottlieb's Avid Reader: A Life; review by J. Michael Lennon in the TLS.

Upcoming Auctions

- Printed Books, Maps & Documents at Dominic Winter Auctioneers, 25 January.

- Fine Literature and Modern First Editions at PBA Galleries, 26 January.

- Travel & Exploration at Bonhams London, 1 February.

Monday, January 16, 2017

Links & Reviews

- This week's Sotheby's sale of a remarkable collection of Hamilton manuscripts garnered a NYTimes report and a Fine Books Blog post by Rebecca Rego Barry.

- The BPL has digitized their copy of Moxon's Mechanick Exercises (1683).

- Over at Literary Hub, Rebecca Rego Barry previewed the sale of some important pieces of Doubleday publishing history at Doyle this week.

- A "Book History Unbound" section has been added to the SHARP website, as a space for Book History contributors to post additional materials.

- ILAB released a warning this week about a book circulating with a forged Darwin inscription.

- The California International Antiquarian Book Fair celebrates fifty years this February; I'm looking forward to attending for the first time!

- Early American bookplates are the order of the day on the Princeton Graphic Arts Collection blog.

- A new digital collation tool is now available for download.

- Bruce Springsteen's archive is going to Monmouth University.

- The Center for the History of Print and Digital Culture at the University of Wisconsin Madison will host what looks like a fascinating conference in September, "BH and DH: Book History and Digital Humanities." See the page for the call for papers, &c.

- The new journal Libraries: Culture, History, and Society is now accepting submissions for the second issue.

- Nancy Campbell writes on the "Beauty of Books" for the TLS.

- On the OUP blog, James Cortada asks how map reading has changed over the past several centuries.

- A new podcast from AAS features interviews with AAS research fellows.

- A Watertown, NY woman was arrested after attempting to steal rare books from the Flower Public Library in Watertown.

- From Michiko Kakutani, "Obama's Secret to Surviving the White House Years: Books," as well as the transcript of the interview for the piece.

Reviews

- A new translation of Dumas' The Red Sphinx; review by Michael Dirda in the WaPo.

- Ruth Franklin's Shirley Jackson and Miles Hyman's recent graphic adaptation of "The Lottery"; review by Emilie Bickerton in the TLS.

- Kevin Dann's Expect Great Things; review by John Kaag in the NYTimes.

Upcoming Auctions

- Alexander Hamilton: An Important Family Archive of Letters and Manuscripts at Sotheby's New York, 18 January

- Books, Art and Ephemera: Whaling, Horror, 16th Century, &c. at National Book Auctions, 21 January